This meeting between human, performance, and landscape might be vividly enabled by maps and models, but it exists outside of them, in a tender and ephemeral place…

I am a dance artist and my sister is a hydrogeologist, developing a software that maps tens of thousands of iterations of how groundwater can move through a karst landscape. We are embarking on a project which relates movement on a human scale to the movement of groundwater, with an understanding that these are intimately linked by two essential qualities: ephemerality and physical presence. Yet, dance, geology, and mapping softwares are concerned with movement on vastly different scales and rhythms. Might our choreographic and digital landscapes provoke a renewed sensitivity and conscientious towards the future of the ecological system which we cohabit? Our questions and answers in this project are wholly dependent on the emotional and intellectual investment of the spectators who embark in our project. They are meaningful only in so far as they speak to someone’s lived reality in their landscape and ecosystem. This meeting between human, performance, and landscape might be vividly enabled by maps and models, but it exists outside of them, in a tender and ephemeral place.

-Lucy Fandel

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